I have a friend bicycling across America 

He phoned a few minutes ago just to say hello. The weather is good and he is doing well. Today saw him going through Gallup, New Mexico and setting up camp a few miles west of there. Tomorrow he will enter Arizona and that will be his first time in the “Grand Canyon State”

 This young man is 24 years old and is on quite an adventure. No cause and no social media. 

“Go to Your Strengths Athlete”

I feel like I can handle adversity, and although it may knock me down, I won’t stay there. That strength gives me confidence that I can respond to the challenges life brings. It leaves me feeling somewhat confident and relaxed. 

The phrase “Go to Your Strengths Athlete” came to me in the book “Momentum” . . . . . written by Mark Bravo 

a quote about adversity 

“Adversity is like a strong wind. It tears away from us all but the things that cannot be torn, so that we see ourselves as we really are”     Arthur Golden

4 year anniversary 

Thank you for reminding me Jennifer. 

It was 4 years ago today that Jack (me) climbed a short hill and for the first time in my life, looked out at the Pacific Ocean. The Journey was to raise awareness concerning alzheimer’s. 2,594 miles were on foot, 458 were in the passenger seat of a car.

Marina, California

The picture above is of the place and the day of the unofficial finish. The official ending would be a few days later in Monterey, California. 

I’m thankful to everyone that helped make the Journey possible.

 

What did Robert E. Lee think about memorials?  – may surprise you 

“I think it wiser,” the retired military leader wrote about a proposed Gettysburg memorial in 1869, “…not to keep open the sores of war but to follow the examples of those nations who endeavored to obliterate the marks of civil strife, to commit to oblivion the feelings engendered.”

Lee advocated protection of just one form of memorial: headstones in cemeteries.

The above paragraphs were taken from the PBS story the link below will take you to:

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/robert-e-lee-opposed-confederate-monuments/

what color was the end of the tube?

This may be of some interest, maybe not. In junior high school on the first day of civics class, the teacher called me to the front. He asked me to stand behind his desk. He walked around in front of his desk and held up a cardboard tube. It probably had once held wrapping paper. One end was pointing at me and the other at the class. He asked me what color was on the end of the tube. I answered “yellow” – then he asked the class what color they saw and in a unified voice, they answered  “blue” – he asked me if I was sure and I answered yes. He asked the class if they were sure and they answered yes. 

He said “from here on” may answer how we come out of this. If we are intolerant of one another while figuring it out, we may finally see the truth about the colors or view point etc, but we may no longer like each other and may have caused harm to our relationship, and that would matter because we all have to exist in the same space.

In that example the teacher knew their would be agreement when we looked from the same end. Now the question may be, which end should we look from, or should we remember both. In deciding that, the tolerance word pops up again. 

One other thing, he congratulated me for not changing my mind after seeing every one disagreeing with me. (in that instance, it was easy)

LET your eyes look straight ahead – trail running and life

I’ve ran, jogged and walked many miles on single track. Sometimes it was smooth and didn’t take much work to stay upright. Other times their were lots of roots and rocks on the trail and limbs hanging down. If I remained steadfast, things went mostly good, no falls, no cuts or bruises on my head. If I ran by chance, I fell often. 

in my lane – a truck

I was driving on U.S.Highway 19 this afternoon, between Pelham and Camilla, Ga. In an instant a pickup truck going in the opposite direction, as I, was in my lane. Just as quickly it darted back, barely missing my car. I was doing the speed limit (55). It would have been a horrific wreck. I slowed and realized I had been doing everything required of me. That was close. Things could have been so different this evening, than they are. 

It brought up bad memories 

https://jackfussellacrosstheland.wordpress.com/?s=I+lost+a+cousin+in+a+car+wreck+today&submit=Search

Steve Fugate 

I think I began following his Facebook page in 2012. Steve told me he is currently crossing America for the ninth time, on foot. The message is “Love Life” I drove from mom’s house in Roberta to Thomasville, Georgia to speak with him today. We have talked more times on the phone than I could count. I enjoyed the time with my friend. 

U.S.Highway 84, near Thomasville, Georgia

“Seek first to understand, then to be understood”

Habit 5 from “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”

“If you’re like most people, you probably seek first to be understood; you want to get your point across. And in doing so, you may ignore the other person completely, pretend that you’re listening, selectively hear only certain parts of the conversation or attentively focus on only the words being said, but miss the meaning entirely. So why does this happen? Because most people listen with the intent to reply, not to understand. You listen to yourself as you prepare in your mind what you are going to say, the questions you are going to ask, etc. You filter everything you hear through your life experiences, your frame of reference. You check what you hear against your autobiography and see how it measures up. And consequently, you decide prematurely what the other person means before he/she finishes communicating.”

The paragraph above comes from the article the link below leads you to:

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/5609892

to keep going, Keep Going