If you chase two rabbits, both may get away

on Google, this is attributed to Confucius, but also to a Romanian proverb.

From Philosiblog.com

As an example, have you ever had someone throw two things to you? How many times do you look back and forth between the objects trying to figure out which one to catch? By the time you have decided, how often is it too late?

On the other hand, if you decide up front that you will try to catch both of them at the same time, how well does that work for you? Yes, there are people with that talent. But most of us do not. In both cases, we usually miss both objects.

If we make a firm decision to catch one of them, it is usually pretty easy to grab it. But if part way through the arc of travel, we change our mind, it’s going to be a lot harder. And it might be worth the effort if you recognize the other item is a priceless family heirloom, right?

We are often ‘stuck’ in analysis paralysis, and that has to stop. We will almost never have all the information we need to make a perfect decision. We must do our best to find out what we can, and then decide. Yes, we need to monitor things, and make sure we notice any signs of trouble.

This is a picture my daughter made concerning my indecision. I learned that sometimes, a lot of times, I can’t figure out the best thing to do, so I get up and go. If it’s the wrong path, that will show itself soon, then I can try again.


My goal number 1 for the trip I start on January 1st, 2016 is to go from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean, every foot on foot.

  • it’s attainable
  • it’s worthwhile

If I attach to many strings to it, it could become overwhelming to me and then I would be forced to change the Goal.

The “Goal” for the 2016 Journey is simple.

  • every foot, on foot, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean

Everything else are plans, or things to do

  • raising awareness
  • pushing the stroller
  • any time limit
  • destination
  • alone or not

I may have to change the plan, but hopefully not the goal.

wonder who he was . . . where he came from

somewhere well west of here last year, it was pretty darn cold. I walked out the door of the hotel and the temperature was dropping fast and the sky was filling up with clouds. It was getting dark. The wind sped up and it began to snow. It was blowing sideways. I went back in the room for a few minutes. I stuck my head back out again. It was hard to see. I saw a man with a pack on his back. He was going pretty slow. I threw on a minimal amount of clothing and went to see him. The wind was so strong and the snow coming down so hard that we could not hear each other. I was ill equipped to be out there. I finally stuck my thumb in the air and my face, I hoped, along with my thumb was asking if he was okay. His face was the face of seriousness. He gave me a thumbs up and slightly smiled. I headed back to my room, found more clothing and went back out. I couldn’t find him. Guess he got a ride.

may look bad, but gotta keep at it

I try to hide my age sometimes. Sometimes it’s pain, other times emotion. That takes to much energy. I have realized that keeping going is the important part, not how I look while doing that. People see me struggling, they want me to quit. I appreciate where they are coming from, but I have to disregard the advice. I have to keep on, because I promised.

Pancreatic cancer

For 40 years, the survival rate for pancreatic cancer has remained in
the single digits – despite an increase in the incidence of the disease,
despite the fact that it is the fourth leading cause of cancer death,
and despite the progress made on other cancers. Survival rates
for pancreatic cancer have remained relatively the same because
the federal government’s approach to pancreatic cancer has been
relatively the same – provide a trickle of research funding in response
to a river of need.

I don’t understand the lack of funding. I’m sorry. I just don’t.

the omelet lady at Amicalola Falls

She is always making people smile. Always asking me if I am okay. Always hugs me. She makes her omelets like an artist paints.

She makes people smile. Love this lady…..

Dr. Jonas Salk – polio – awareness

I believe this statement.

Before a group of people will spend incredible amounts of money and/or time on a problem

  • they need to know the problem exists
  • they need to know the costs if not attended to
  • they need to believe a solution is available
  • they need to know “the problem” must be solved.

In my opinion, that’s what awareness is for. Who knows, with awareness, what is important or not. I have thought about it in this way.

Dr. Salk and the folks that helped him, found the vaccine that stopped polio. How did he get into research? How did he come to work on the polio problem. He was made AWARE about something that put him on the path. It could have been anyone, anywhere that said something one day that started Mr. Salk on his journey that saved millions of people.

I heard this long ago;  “50% of all advertising is a complete waste of money. We just don’t know which 50%”

I know this. We all have to keep raising awareness about the most expensive disease in history.


from the Alzheimer's Association website



Sunday at Amicalola

November 29th, 2015.        12:46pm

I was at Amicalola Falls this morning. The skies were cloudy and the temperature was about 60 degrees.  Stopped at the visitor center to say hello to my friends. One was sick. Hope she feels better soon. 

Headed to the lodge to park the car. This is an important part of what I do. I try to park it so folks will see the signs. One sign shares the 24/7 helpline phone number for the Alzheimer’s Association and one suggest getting involved with the “Walk to End Alzheimer’s” event, also with the Alzheimer’s Association.

Went in the lodge to say hello to staff. It’s always great to see them. Today, I had a surprise. I looked up and their she was. She had worked here before. She was always encouraging me. She would see me walk in the lobby, and run to give me a quick hug and tell me to always keep going. We all miss her.


I started walking and then jogging and covered a few miles at the top of the falls. The drizzle was beginning to make things a little slick.

No conversations about alzheimers disease today. I finished up and headed out of the park.

Wow, in 33 days I will leave St. Simon’s Island, Georgia and head west on foot.


Thank you

Although there are many paths up the mountain, one small step is the only way to begin the climb. And always remember you are not alone and there will be help along the way.”


Some help I knew of and some not.

Across the Land appreciates all of the help from everyone. We have all made a lot of impact in the fight with alzheimers disease. Here are a few impact points.

  • $34,000 donated to the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Over 60 television interviews that mentioned the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Over 100 newspaper interviews that mentioned the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Over 20 radio interviews that mentioned the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Gave out the 24/7 helpline to thousands of people
  • Shared a lot of information personally to caregivers that helped them deal with alzheimers disease

I ran a little, jogged a little more than ran, and probably walked the majority of the time. I’m not a public speaker, not a media relations kind of person and not a fund raiser and I am not a counselor. That may let some reading this, know how much help I received.

In reality, I ran, jogged and walked a lot of miles. Someone else did the rest. Again, to that someone, thank you for letting me be a part of working with you to help in the fight with alzheimers disease.

Saturday post – a milestone reached

November 28th, 2015.        5:12pm

15,000  miles for the total project in 1271 days

I drove to Amicalola Falls. What’s new huh? The park was in overflow condition by around noon. I knew I needed 7 miles to reach the milestone of 15,000 miles, so I took it easy. The weather was ideal, with the high near 65 and no clouds.


from Google Images

I am guessing I had 4 or 5 conversations with past caregivers. I had one young man tell me a little about losing his grandmother to alzheimers. His finals words as he walked away were “I sure loved granny”

Awesome from England

I see her a lot going up and downs the stairs.