November 7th 2019 – Thursday

The past several days have found me continuing my caregiving duties and working to remain fit and productive.

In the month of October, I was on foot approximately 215 miles. Tomorrow will be the beginning of me tracking my time on my stationary bicycle.

The Charity Miles application continues to play an important role in my life. My two charities of choice are the Alzheimer’s Association and the Special Olympics.

Mom’s short term memory seems to be failing. According to some literature, the possibility is that some of her moments are not being stored, thus not being retrievable.

Great strides have been made in my caregiving abilities and although tough duty sometimes, I can’t imagine not being here.

Biogen has decided to ask for FDA approval for aducanumab. That’s the drug they had first deemed a failure.

Big news in Columbia with the family that all get early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Life is Good . . .

About National Family Caregivers month

https://www.syracuse.com/living/2019/11/how-to-help-a-dementia-caregiver-during-national-family-caregivers-month.html?outputType=amp&__twitter_impression=true

Walking – from the Mayo Clinic #ENDALZ

“Walking is a gentle, low-impact cardio exercise that can ease you into a higher level of fitness and health”

The link below will take you to the article, the paragraph above came from.
http://diet.mayoclinic.org/diet/move/walk-for-weight-loss?xid=nl_MayoClinicDiet_20150715

Still Alice #ENDALZ

Lisa Genova wrote a book and it became a movie.

This, in my opinion, is a great movie. This morning, it came to mind and I watched it again. When she gave a speech, in the movie, at the Alzheimer’s Association, to me, that was an emotional time.

Because of viewing it this morning, I messaged a friend in Texas to see how her 50 something year old husband is living with his early onset Alzheimer’s. She said he is physically well.

Alzheimer’s and hearing #ENDALZ

I am not a scientist or a doctor, but I have gut feelings based on spending many hours with Alzheimer’s patients and caregivers.

Hearing loss may emulate Alzheimer’s disease. People may pretend like they can hear others, for whatever reason. If they didn’t really hear, it was not committed to memory. When brought up later under circumstances when they can hear, they will provide say they do not remember such.

Francisco Lopera – neurologist #ENDALZ

“She has a secret in her biology,” Dr. Lopera said. “This case is a big window to discover new approaches.”

The link below will take you to the article the paragraph above came from.

The full time advocacy of Across the Land #endalz

I had never been asked to do the impossible. Fortunately, many angels showed up. Though challenged and often doubtful, we got it done. For 1107 days, we did the work.

For my dad and the millions of others that passed away with Alzheimer’s.

“When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left, and could say, ‘I used everything you gave me” Erma Bombeck

This is an abridged account of my full time advocacy. This account covers the time from January 12th 2013 until January 24th 2016.

The first step was taken near Savannah Georgia.

The mission was to raise money and awareness for the Alzheimer’s Association.

The first few months were spent on a continuous walk from Savannah to Kingman Arizona. The picture below is worth a thousand words.

Following the 9 state walk, for several months, a state park in north Georgia was my home. The car in the photo below was parked in a conspicuous place. My job was to be seen and speak with folks that approached me.

After that, hundreds of runs were made using the car, my shirt and sometimes the stroller. This method was used in several states.

The stroller, the car, and my clothing seemed to attract folks.

During this time there was media coverage from local television, newspaper, radio and magazine. There were meet and greets and one on one meetings.

Many of the nights were spent in senior care facilities, donated motel rooms, private homes and a tent.

The last step was at mom’s door. The full time job was over. I stood in the warmth of mom’s kitchen, in running clothes, and realized I was now a caregiver.

To see more details, follow the link below . . .

https://jackfussellacrosstheland.wordpress.com/results/

My dad passed away with Alzheimer’s disease in a nursing home in Jesup Georgia.

My ride back to the car

I had just turned around to head several miles back to the car. Someone shouted and asked if I needed a bottle of water. I did and they ended up taking me back to the car.

image

The lady on the left had an alzheimers connection, keyword being had. She drove me to my car. Her and her husband, on her left, like to help folks. The two on the right were very encouraging to me.

Where is your faith Jack?

On the phone with a close buddy. He asked how far I would go today. I told him that I have to keep in mind that I probably will have to walk back to the car. He exclaimed:

“have faith Jack. Before you start walking back or hitchhiking, stop for a moment and asked God for his help. Ask him if their is any reason he wouldn’t help you to please let you know and tell him you will try and fix it. Have faith Jack”

I did that. I prayed that prayer.

Some travelers I met

Henry as discussed today.

Met a man walking 21 miles a day because his daughter had died at age 21

Met a guy riding a bicycle in north Georgia for his, I think his 4th year. Never said why.

Met a man driving a covered wagon pulled by two mules. Had been doing it for years.

Met a lot of young, strong bicycle riders.

Met a guy going barefooted across America.

Met a guy raising awareness concerning rare disease.

Met a guy walking from Chicago to Atlanta for alzheimers.

Met a man riding his horse across America.