Tag Archives: Across The Land

My favorite quote

“When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left, and could say, ‘I used everything you gave me’ ” Erma Bombeck

Mark Lein shared this with me many years ago and the sound of it brought peace to me. It’s an all encompassing quote and is my favorite.

Man With Down Syndrome Doing His Part to Find the Cure for Alzheimer’s | The Mighty

https://themighty.com/2016/11/man-with-down-syndrome-doing-his-part-to-find-the-cure-for-alzheimers/?utm_source=DownSyndrome_Page&utm_medium=Facebook

World Down Syndrome Day . a day to think about inclusion and acceptance

Someone told me that people born with Down syndrome need help.

Thinking about that made me realize something.

Looking back over my life it’s easy to see that help, from others, has always been a necessity. It began with doctors and nurses on October 8th, 1950 and continues on to this day.

Parents, siblings, aunts, uncles, neighbors, friends, teachers, to name a few, have provided help to me.

I was ran over, had pneumonia four times, broke an arm, had chicken pox at age 37, was in ICU four days and anemic most of my life. Someone helped me through those times, and it was costly.

Then something else occurred to me. I sat and thought of the lives of several friends and saw the same requirement for help in their lives as was needed for mine.

If I was in the same situation as friends of mine that were asked if they wanted to abort their baby that would be born with Down syndrome, my answer would be what their answer was . . . “No”, and that answer would come quickly.

the Starfish story again

A young girl was walking along a beach upon which thousands of starfish had been washed up during a terrible storm. When she came to each starfish, she would pick it up, and throw it back into the ocean. People watched her with amusement.

She had been doing this for some time when a man approached her and said, “Little girl, why are you doing this? Look at this beach! You can’t save all these starfish. You can’t begin to make a difference!”

The girl seemed crushed, suddenly deflated. But after a few moments, she bent down, picked up another starfish, and hurled it as far as she could into the ocean. Then she looked up at the man and replied, “Well, I made a difference to that one!”

The old man looked at the girl inquisitively and thought about what she had done and said. Inspired, he joined the little girl in throwing starfish back into the sea. Soon others joined, and all the starfish were saved. Adapted from a story by Loren Eisley

Hope he had a good life . . .

I walk a lot here in Roberta, and noticed a man in a pickup often, always waved. He stopped, we chatted, he had cancer. He thanked me for caring. We didn’t even exchange names.

Recently I noticed he wasn’t around anymore. I described him and his truck to a neighbor. Bad news, he passed away.

Wow, this type stuff shocks me . . .

He was a nice guy. We never know when stuff may happen . . .

I hope he had a good life . . . I’m glad we talked . . .

A New Beginning . . .

Today is March 11, 2019 and it’s time for a fresh start with this blog.

My next birthday cake will have 69 candles on it. My hope is to remain active, both mentally and physically for many more years and this blog will serve as a record of my thoughts as I take this journey.

January 2nd, 2016 blog post

Started at the Hardee’s on 341 and finished at Cowpen Swamp Creek.

I saw on this website that a donation was made to the Alzheimers Association.

Had dinner with Sid and Bobbie Sue.

Staying at Felton’s tonight.

Pictures from today.

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5 folks stopped and spoke with me about the trip I am on.

Not as tired today as I was yesterday. No real pain..

The Brunswick News – Larry Hobbs

Our thanks to Larry and the Brunswick News newspaper.

I received an email from Larry, requesting an interview for the newspaper. Brunswick is the area where I will start walking across America on January 1st. I gave him a call and we talked. I asked him if he would include the 1.800.272.3900 phone number, in the article and he said he would. That’s a big accomplishment for us. It’s what makes us feel like we have done our work. He asked for a picture and we sent him one.

The Brunswick suscribers will see that picture, with an article, and it will have the 24/7 helpline phone number included. Someone that sees the article may need help. The phone number is 1.800.272.3900. The phone call will be answered by a trained counselor for the Alzheimer’s Association.

Thank you

Although there are many paths up the mountain, one small step is the only way to begin the climb. And always remember you are not alone and there will be help along the way.”

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Some help I knew of and some not.

Across the Land appreciates all of the help from everyone. We have all made a lot of impact in the fight with alzheimers disease. Here are a few impact points.

  • $34,000 donated to the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Over 60 television interviews that mentioned the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Over 100 newspaper interviews that mentioned the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Over 20 radio interviews that mentioned the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Gave out the 24/7 helpline to thousands of people
  • Shared a lot of information personally to caregivers that helped them deal with alzheimers disease

I ran a little, jogged a little more than ran, and probably walked the majority of the time. I’m not a public speaker, not a media relations kind of person and not a fund raiser and I am not a counselor. That may let some reading this, know how much help I received.

In reality, I ran, jogged and walked a lot of miles. Someone else did the rest. Again, to that someone, thank you for letting me be a part of working with you to help in the fight with alzheimers disease.

Wednesday – research

November 18th, 2015.           7:12 am

I was reading last night concerning the finding of insulin. For people with diabetes mellitus, the year 1921 is a meaningful one. That was the year Canadian physician Frederick Banting and medical student Charles H. Best discovered the hormone insulin in pancreatic extracts of dogs. On July 30, 1921, they injected the hormone into a diabetic dog and found that it effectively lowered the dog’s blood glucose levels to normal. By the end of that year, with the help of Canadian chemist James B. Collip and Scottish physiologist J.J.R. Macleod, Banting and Best purified insulin, and the next year it was used to successfully treat a boy suffering from severe diabetes.

I have had the pleasure of speaking to several scientists that are devoting their time to finding a cure for alzheimers. They fascinate me because of their intelligence, patience and persistence.

My opinion is that we have the best of the best working on all sorts of theories to find a cure for alzheimers disease. Again, my thinking is their biggest obstacle is a lack of funds. Grants seem hard to come by and it is not because of the ideas the scientists have, but plain and simply, it’s the money flow from our lawmakers. We need a ground swell from the electorate or we need the lawmakers to realize the urgency and show leadership and appropriate the funds we need. Maybe a little of both.

Here is an excerpt from the Alzheimer’s Association’s website:

73 million voters have had a family member or close friend with Alzheimer’s disease

More than one-third, or 52 million American voters have provided care or personal assistance to a relative, friend or neighbor with Alzheimer’s

82 percent of voters nationwide are concerned about Alzheimer’s disease

87 percent of voters feel unprepared or only somewhat prepared to meet care needs of a family member who develops Alzheimer’s disease

The majority, 64 percent, of voters would be more likely to vote for a presidential candidate who has pledged to support a major national research effort to fight Alzheimer’s