Tag Archives: Across The Land

Thank you

Although there are many paths up the mountain, one small step is the only way to begin the climb. And always remember you are not alone and there will be help along the way.”

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Some help I knew of and some not.

Across the Land appreciates all of the help from everyone. We have all made a lot of impact in the fight with alzheimers disease. Here are a few impact points.

  • $34,000 donated to the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Over 60 television interviews that mentioned the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Over 100 newspaper interviews that mentioned the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Over 20 radio interviews that mentioned the Alzheimer’s Association
  • Gave out the 24/7 helpline to thousands of people
  • Shared a lot of information personally to caregivers that helped them deal with alzheimers disease

I ran a little, jogged a little more than ran, and probably walked the majority of the time. I’m not a public speaker, not a media relations kind of person and not a fund raiser and I am not a counselor. That may let some reading this, know how much help I received.

In reality, I ran, jogged and walked a lot of miles. Someone else did the rest. Again, to that someone, thank you for letting me be a part of working with you to help in the fight with alzheimers disease.

Wednesday – research

November 18th, 2015.           7:12 am

I was reading last night concerning the finding of insulin. For people with diabetes mellitus, the year 1921 is a meaningful one. That was the year Canadian physician Frederick Banting and medical student Charles H. Best discovered the hormone insulin in pancreatic extracts of dogs. On July 30, 1921, they injected the hormone into a diabetic dog and found that it effectively lowered the dog’s blood glucose levels to normal. By the end of that year, with the help of Canadian chemist James B. Collip and Scottish physiologist J.J.R. Macleod, Banting and Best purified insulin, and the next year it was used to successfully treat a boy suffering from severe diabetes.

I have had the pleasure of speaking to several scientists that are devoting their time to finding a cure for alzheimers. They fascinate me because of their intelligence, patience and persistence.

My opinion is that we have the best of the best working on all sorts of theories to find a cure for alzheimers disease. Again, my thinking is their biggest obstacle is a lack of funds. Grants seem hard to come by and it is not because of the ideas the scientists have, but plain and simply, it’s the money flow from our lawmakers. We need a ground swell from the electorate or we need the lawmakers to realize the urgency and show leadership and appropriate the funds we need. Maybe a little of both.

Here is an excerpt from the Alzheimer’s Association’s website:

73 million voters have had a family member or close friend with Alzheimer’s disease

More than one-third, or 52 million American voters have provided care or personal assistance to a relative, friend or neighbor with Alzheimer’s

82 percent of voters nationwide are concerned about Alzheimer’s disease

87 percent of voters feel unprepared or only somewhat prepared to meet care needs of a family member who develops Alzheimer’s disease

The majority, 64 percent, of voters would be more likely to vote for a presidential candidate who has pledged to support a major national research effort to fight Alzheimer’s

The Walk to End Alzheimer’s event in Rome is over

November 14th, 2015.          11:55am

Perfect weather for this event and a perfect setting. It was held at the Rome Braves baseball stadium. There was a very large crowd and they were excited! Here are some pictures.

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Walk to End Alzheimer's in Rome, GA

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Walk to End Alzheimer's in Rome, GA

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Rome, Georgia

I’m thinking that a lot of hard work when into this walk, both from the Alzheimers Association staff and the volunteers. All of the folks out there were so awesome.

Thank you for reading my blog.
Jack Fussell

about alzheimers research

November 11th, 2015          11:26am

Been using Google and searching for trends concerning alzheimers.

It seems the group of folks that felt that maybe alzheimers was not really a disease is dwindling.

It seems the group of folks that think we should be looking at the role of other organs of the body is growing.

Most in depth articles still point to the biggest problem being funding for the research.

Thank you for reading my blog.
Jack Fussell

I will WALK on U.S. Highway 80

I will leave St. Simon’s Island on January 1st, 2016 and WALK northeast and get on U.S. Highway 80 in Dublin, GA. From Dublin I will go west on 80 all the way to Dallas, TX. In between St. Simon’s and Dublin I will pass the cemetery where my dad is buried.

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My mom lives about 1/3 mile off of U.S. Highway 80 in Roberta, GA. My nephew Scott lives on 80, about 1/2 mile from her. That will, I think, be an unusual feeling, to WALK to mom’s from St. Simon’s Island.

Wednesday, October 14th, 2015 blog post

14,684 miles for the total project in 1228 days

In the Appalachian foothills again. Amicalola is my home. I love the scenery, the sounds and the staff.

24 miles today. Mixed it up. Lots of single track today. Climbed some. The trails are in good shape. In North Georgia their are lots of roots an rocks to negotiate. If you don’t, you’re on the ground bleeding. It was hammer time today and I pushed it. I felt good.

Look at these leaves already.

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BOB showed up in the form of sport utility model.

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Great conversations today.

Saturday, October 3, 2015 blog post

14,556 miles for the total project in 1217 days

Headed to Amicalola Falls early. Mark Lein and I went, on foot, to High Shoals Baptist Church and turned around and came back. We were in the rain constantly. We walked and talked about a lot of things. We got back to the lodge and had lunch. We both did a great job of eating healthy. Mark headed home and I headed to Holly Springs. Here is a picture of us from a few weeks ago.
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Keri Roetin put a picture on Facebook that made me emotional. Here is that picture.

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Keri is my honorary granddaughter.

While I was in the visitor center, a lady about my age walked by and looked at me and said “thank you for what you do”

The staff of Coral Hospitality were awesome to me and hundreds of other guests today.

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August 10th, 2015 in Bartow County

Ryan took me to my daughter’s home.

Amy delivered me to my starting point, about a mile from the Bartow County Courthouse. Ran to the courthouse and took this picture.

Bartow County Courthouse on August 10, 2015

Bartow County Courthouse on August 10, 2015

Got back on the road and chatted at the fire department for a minute.

Bartow County Fire Department on 293. August 10th, 2015

Bartow County Fire Department on 293. August 10th, 2015

I traveled on SR 293 most of the time. It is a two lane road with beautiful scenery.

Bartow County on August 10th, 2015

Bartow County on August 10th, 2015

Bartow County on 293. August 10th, 2015

Bartow County on 293. August 10th, 2015

Randall James picked me and my gear up. He will take me back to the Dollar General in Kingston, GA tomorrow morning and I will head into Floyd County.

Mid nineties today with high humidity. I was soaked from sweating by the end of my traveling day. I was out with my stroller for about six hours. No hills. Lots of curves and that calls for a lot of focus.

This run went great. The start felt almost trivial. Near the end of my day I was feeling strong and confident. The BOB Stroller is made to last and it has done that. Well over 4000 miles on it. This stroller has no modifications. It doesn’t need any.

It makes for an easier day when someone is coming out to pick me up. It’s a lot less stressful.

A lot of folks saw the alzheimers signs and my shirt. I spoke with a lot people. I will call this a good day.

Special thanks to my daughter Amy, Kelly, Wayne Mix and Randall James. Because of these four, I am sleeping comfortably in the home of Mr. James.

My purpose

is to raise awareness concerning alzheimers disease. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, 1,289 individuals are diagnosed with alzheimers, in America alone, every day. 

Approximately 3 times that number become caregivers. Over 40% of caregivers report the stress is almost unbearable.

The Alzheimer’s Association has been in existence since 1980. They fund research and provide services to the alzheimers community.

They have a well designed 24/7 Helpline. The calls are always answered by highly trained counselors for the Alzheimer’s Association. The phone number is 1.800.272.3900

My main focus is to tell as many folks as possible about the helpline.

What can they do ?

She is 51 years old and her husband is 53 years old. They both work full time jobs. Each month after paying their bills their is not much money left.

Her mom has been diagnosed with alzheimers disease. Her mom can’t be alone anymore.

She needs to pay someone to watch her mom so she can continue to bring in the income they barely squeeze by on. She can’t ask her husband to watch her, because he brings in part of their income too.

Her mom’s small social security check will pay for her food and sitter for about a week.

She can’t put her in a nursing home because their is not enough money for that from her mom’s income.

This is a reality being played out all over America. Yes their are answers. Coming up with answers will be time consuming and take some expertise in different areas.

This family is beginning a long hard struggle with many twist and turns.

They can start by calling the Alzheimer’s Association at 1.800.272.3900 and asking for help. This is the phone number for the 24 hour helpline. It can be called 7 days a week. The phone call will be answered by trained counselors.